The Breakdown: Antioxidants

The Breakdown: Antioxidants

It seems that television news broadcasts are constantly advertising a new antioxidant-rich "superfood".  They tout the cancer prevention values of antioxidants as if it's a miracle.  It's no wonder that cancer prevention is a hot topic in the news. About 25% of deaths in the United States are caused by various forms of cancer.  But for all of the talk about antioxidants, I for one, was clueless about what they actually do. What are antioxidants?  How do they help prevent cancer?

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Shade Market Cooking: Soy Milk

Shade Market Cooking: Soy Milk

Whole soybeans are extremely nutritious; one cooked cup contains 43% of daily omega-3 fatty acids, 49% of iron, 41% of fiber, and 57% of protein as well as a host of other beneficial nutrients.  For all of that nutrition, one cup of cooked soy only contains about 15% of daily calories.  For vegetarians, whole soybean consumption is a must, but they can also be a great source of protein and nutrients for meat eaters.  Soy is not a meat alternative, it's a delicious legume all its own. Whole soy products include: tofu, soy milk, and fermented soybean products such as miso and tempeh.

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Self-Reliance in Thailand

Self-Reliance in Thailand

When I think of the "American Dream", I think of George and Lenny huddled next to a campfire making grand plans.  The idea of being able to "live off the fat of the land" is as American as cold beer and barbecue.  It's fulfillment, however, is far less common.  In Of Mice and Men, Steinbeck was writing of an "American Dream" that is all but dead.  Like George and Lenny, most farmers never experience the ideal of being self reliant.  Ironically, it is here in Thailand, at PunPun Center for Self Reliance, that I see the actualization of an American Dream.

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Farewell America

Today we say goodbye to America for the next couple of years.  On January 8th, we will arrive in Chiang Mai, Thailand.  On January 10th, we will start a two week course on sustainable farming and Thai Cooking at PunPun Farm.  During those two weeks it will be hard for us to update our journal, as we will have very limited internet access.  Before we go into this "internet silence", we have a few things to say to everyone at home.

Shade Market has, and always will, rely on the support of great people.  When Paige had the idea to travel the world, write, eat and spread love, it seemed idyllic and unrealistic.  But she has never wavered from her conviction that Shade Market would become something great one day.  It seems that passion is contagious.  "Let me know how I can help!" has been the response we have gotten so often when we explain our vision.  Well, those were more than kind words.  Our friends, family, and supporters all over the world made it possible for us to exceed our goal on Kickstarter, and help fund our impending travel and research.  There are no words to express our gratitude.  All we can do now is make you all proud to be a part of Shade Market.  As we embark on this journey, later tonight, you are on our minds and in our hearts.

Of course, this is only a goodbye for now.  We plan on having our first physical Shade Market open in the U.S.A.  We can't wait to share what we learn with you in person.  For now, follow along online.  The stories, recipes, and photos we post are your insight to the world we are traveling and the book we are writing.  We love you.  We miss you already.  Farewell!

-xoxo P&J

 

Shade Market Cooking: Pickle Brine

Shade Market Cooking: Pickle Brine

So often we buy vegetables with a plan on cooking them, and so often they rot in our fridge.  An estimated 28% of vegetables that are purchased are thrown in the garbage by the consumer.  Besides being a sad thing, waste has larger repercussions.  Wasting food also wastes all of the money, effort and time that go into getting produce from the farms to our tables.  Having some pickle brine handy can help reduce waste at home. 

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Mindful Eating: A Struggle with Meat

Towards the end of the year, many of us self-reflect and evaluate what we want for ourselves. My continuing hope is to listen to my body. Over the last 4 years, I’ve struggled with what my body is saying about whether or not I should eat meat.

This is not a moral objection to eating meat masquerading as a health concern. I want to, I really do. This is especially true as I embark on this project exploring and reporting on all things in the intersection between humans and food. But, certain meats just don’t agree with me. Where most people get energy from meat-protein, I feel weighed down, and my body has a hard time processing it. Some meats go down more harshly than others: I was not-so-kindly reminded after eating lengua & cabeza tacos last week. But, some meats don’t affect me at all, like chicken and rabbit. I am not the type of person to deprive myself of things I like, but there has to be some self-control if they end up hurting me.

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The Breakdown

Enter the supermarket and enter a place full of uncertainty and pitfalls.  Claims of low fat, and reduced sodium pop out from the packed aisles in every color and shade.  The 50% off sale on Cheetos vies for your attention.  Economy size bags of neon candies scream out, "Buy me!"  But you just went in there to find something good to eat.  Traditionally we deal with this by picking up a package and reading the back.  Nutrition facts can help inform our choice, but they don't show the whole picture.  Fat from a grass-fed cow has vastly different nutritional value than fat from a corn-fed cow.  In the nutrition facts, fat is fat, so there is no noticeable difference in nutrition value of 90% lean ground beef from either type of cow.  When we look closer, we find that the chemical composition of the fat in each cow is where difference lies. 

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Shade Market Cooking: Hard Boiled Eggs

Chicken eggs are a low calorie, nutrient dense food.  One large, boiled egg contains only 78 calories while providing a great source of complex protein, omega-3 fatty acids, choline and iodine, as well as a variety of B vitamins.  Without getting too scientific, all of these nutrients are necessary to our bodies' proper functioning, and some are hard to find in such high levels in other foods.  Eggs are also high in cholesterol, which has at times been seen as cause for alarm.  However, the cholesterol found in eggs is called HDL and is considered the healthy type of cholesterol.  There is no evidence to show that, in an otherwise healthy diet, eggs pose a threat to cardiovascular health. 

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Peace NY: Franny's

Peace NY: Franny's

If you have been following the “Peace NY” series you may have been wondering: isn’t Shade Market about healthy, sustainable food? Why are they posting all these greasy spoons and pizza joints? Well, those places are, for better or worse, a part of NY food culture.  We seek to understand and present to you all aspects of food culture wherever we are.  Today, we showcase a restaurant that is part of NYC’s new food culture.

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Moderate Yourself

With Thanksgiving a couple days away, it's fitting to discuss this topic which few Americans have mastered: why is it that we can't seem to monitor ourselves in eating moderately? We've heard it countless times - eat until just before you feel full. Why don't we listen to our bodies? It's not like we feel good after we stuff ourselves to the point where it's hard to breathe. The human body can use up to 80% of its energy to digest food. If we could make this process easier on our systems - by consuming whole foods that are easily digested, heavy in nutrients, and stopping before we're full - think of the energy we could save and use towards other activities.

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Peace NY: Corner Bistro

There are very few places left in NYC that recall pre-gentrified NY. The days when pornography was being sold freely on the streets, a coffee was 25 cents, and most of Brooklyn wasn't really safe for out-of-towners are all but gone.  Corner Bistro is one of those places, and it’s thriving at it’s original location in the west village. This old-school, dark wood, no-frills bar is packed everyday with people looking for a cheap drink and a great burger.

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Shade Market Cooking: Seasoning

Shade Market Cooking: Seasoning

We all want to reduce our risk of heart disease, cancer, and diabetes by eating healthier. But, we didn't fall in love with food because of its health qualities. We fell in love with the taste. This is why seasoning is so important to us here at Shade Market.  In its most basic sense, seasoning is the application of salt to our food, which accentuates the natural flavor and aroma. Salt is also an essential nutrient.  For these reasons, salt is the only ingredient that appears in virtually all recipes since the beginning of time. With salt as the foundation of seasoning, a well-seasoned dish is one that attains a balanced flavor. 

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Peace New York: Pino's La Forchetta

Peace New York: Pino's La Forchetta

Pino's La Forchetta Pizza opened in 1962 in Park Slope, Brooklyn on 7th Ave. It is located across the street from P.S. 321, the iconic elementary school in Park Slope. When my mother attended 321 in the sixties, third graders were allowed  to go across the street once a week and have a slice for lunch. When I attended in the nineties, the rule was still the same. The first time walking into Pino's as an eight year old, on your own, with slice money in hand, is a memory thousands of Brooklyn natives will never forget. 

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Shade Market Cooking: Stewed Lentils

Shade Market Cooking: Stewed Lentils

 Whether you are looking to develop a more healthy way of eating or are a strict vegetarian or vegan, if lentils are not a mainstay of your pantry they should be. Just one cup of cooked lentils contains 63% daily intake of fiber, 36% daily intake of protein as well as being a good source of several different minerals and B vitamins. Combine this with the fact that lentils contain virtually no fat and you have a food that gives you tons of energy and fills you up without weighing you down. Lentils are eaten around the world as a side dish for meats and fish, in salads, in soups and more. Here is a recipe for basic stewed lentils.

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Peace New York

NYC is one of the most visited cities in the world. It is a city equally important for pleasure seekers, business people, and those who are looking for a new beginning. But, hell, I could wax poetic all day about the essence of NYC, here is the point: after 27 years of living here I am leaving to move across the world in just two weeks!

Anyone reading this who knows New York also knows that New Yorkers are obsessed with their spots. You know, the Chinatown spot, or the doughnut spot, the 24 hour spot. Whatever type of place it may be, over the years these places start to define our experience as much as the good friends we take there. So, in an attempt to say an appropriate goodbye to New York, I present to you the "Peace New York" series; a salute to the places in New York that I will miss dearly. In this way, I can share my spots with my good friends (you) one last time before departing.

-Jason